CUA SWEEK 6250 S103 1801 Evaluation Strategy

CUA SWEEK 6250 S103 1801 Evaluation Strategy ORDER NOW FOR CUSTOMIZED AND ORIGINAL ESSAY PAPERS ON CUA SWEEK 6250 S103 1801 Evaluation Strategy DASS for Measuring Outcomes after Domestic Violence Sandra Simon The Catholic University of America SSS 756D – Evaluation of Social Work Practice March 23, 2020 Introduction The social problem of domestic abuse poses a significant challenge for social workers who must employ therapeutic interventions to support clients to overcome the trauma (Slabbert, 2015). This paper explores the use of the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales (DASS) to measuring the results of therapeutic interventions, such as Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, in women experiencing stress and anxiety because of domestic violence. This paper will also highlight the problem of domestic violence to include a review of the literature addressing the impact of Evidence-Based Practice on intervention outcomes. Further, a hypothesis will be posed to test the relationship between the variables of the evidenced-based intervention practice. CUA SWEEK 6250 S103 1801 Evaluation Strategy Statement of the Problem Domestic violence has a traumatic effect on almost all aspects of the affected person ‘s life. It involves patterns of abusive behaviors aimed at obtaining power over the person being victimized (Robins and Cook, 2018). The target population to be examined is women age 22 to 64, who have been in an abusive relationship and have been exhibiting symptoms of stress and anxiety (Monahan, 2018). This demographic was chosen since women in this age range are more likely to be engaged in an intimate partner relationship. The study will focus on women of all ethnicity and socioeconomic status since it has been found that domestic violence transcends race or other demographic delineations (Monahan, 2018). Women are more likely to be the victim of an intimate partner relationship; 85% of those affected are women, and 15% are men (Robbins & Cook, 2018). Domestic violence can result in devastating physical and emotional trauma that can linger way after the abuse ended (Monahan, 2018). Robins & Cook (2018) further argues that domestic violence has emerged as one of the most apparent cause of anxiety and stress amongst women. The problem of anxiety comes from the physical and emotional abuse which most women tend to endure and ignore for various reasons (Wong, Tiwari, Fong & Bullock, 2016). These reasons include the stigma associated with leaving a marriage/relationship, perception of the society, damaged self-worth, fear, financial constraints, and persevering for the sake of the children (Wong et al., 2016). Remaining in an abusive relationship can result in devastating consequences up to and including death. Almi?, Kütük, Gümü?ta?, & Celik (2018) discuss the impact of domestic violence against women. According to these researchers, domestic violence is linked to various factors such as cultural, mental, psychosocial, and economic instability. Exposure to violence results in mental health disorders such as stress and anxiety in women and even damages the long-term mental growth of their kids (Almi? et al., 2018). These researchers also contend that some women may exhibit post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, are suicidal, and abuse alcohol and other substances. Soleimani, Ahmadi, & Yosefnezhad (2017) agree with Almi? et al. (2018) assertions concerning the relationship between domestic abuse and anxiety and stress among victims. According to Soleimani et al. (2017), intimate partner violence (IPV) has been linked to a rise in depression, PTSD, anxiety, and suicidal thoughts. Women who experience sexual and physical abuse from their spouses tend to exhibit depression-like symptoms. The researchers found that sleep-disorders, self-harm, anxiety, stress, and depression are some of the mental health issues that women have as a result of the trauma and stigma linked to their abuse. If the abuse continues for a long time, victims often experience a decline in self-confidence and self-esteem and usually display feelings of despair Social work practice and specifically clinical social workers have a significant responsibility in all aspects of domestic violence, including advocacy, legislation, practice, and policies (Slabbert., 2015). Although social workers engage in empowering practices and community engagement to achieve the goal of increasing survivor safety and wellbeing, they also help domestic violence survivors stabilize and heal over time through engagement in activities that addresses their symptoms (Robbins & Cook, 2018). To facilitate the therapeutic process, social workers utilize various intervention strategies to help clients deal with the effects of the trauma. These interventions require evaluation to ensure that agreed-upon goals and objectives are being met (Bloom et al., 2009, pg. 4). Single-System Designs (SSD) are evaluation methods that can aid social workers to measure their progress in an intervention (Bloom et al. 2009 pg. 4). The DASS is one such scale that allows clients to self-report their level of anxiety at any given time in the intervention process (Gomez, 2013). This intervention establishes the level of anxiety based on the symptoms the client exhibits, and social workers can use the information to choose therapeutic practices. Additionally, these measures can be used to re-assess the client’s state using the same scale to assess effectiveness (Gomez, 2013). CUA SWEEK 6250 S103 1801 Evaluation Strategy Domestic violence has a traumatic effect on almost all aspects of the affected person ‘s life. It involves patterns of abusive behaviors aimed at obtaining power over the person being victimized (Robins and Cook, 2018). The target population to be examined is women age 22 to 64, who have been in an abusive relationship and have been exhibiting symptoms of stress and anxiety (Monahan, 2018). This demographic was chosen since women in this age range are more likely to be engaged in an intimate partner relationship. The study will focus on women of all ethnicity and socioeconomic status since it has been found that domestic violence transcends race or other demographic delineations (Monahan, 2018). Women are more likely to be the victim of an intimate partner relationship; 85% of those affected are women and 15% are men (Robbins & Cook, 2018). Domestic violence can result in devasting physical, and emotional trauma that can linger way after the violence ended (Monahan, 2018). Robins & Cook (2018) further argues that domestic violence has emerged as one of the most apparent cause of anxiety and stress amongst women. The problem of anxiety comes from the physical and emotional abuse which most women tend to endure and ignore for various reasons (Wong, Tiwari, Fong & Bullock, 2016). These reasons include the stigma associated with leaving a marriage/relationship, perception of the society, damaged self-worth, fear, financial constraints, and persevering for the sake of the children (Wong et al., 2016). Remaining in an abusive relation can result in devastating consequences up and including death. Almi?, Kütük, Gümü?ta?, & Celik (2018) discuss the impact of domestic violence against women. According to these researchers, domestic violence is linked to various factors such as cultural, mental, psychosocial, and economic instability. Exposure to violence results in mental health disorders such as stress and anxiety in women, and even damages the long-term mental growth of their kids (Almi?, et al., 2018). These researchers also contend that some women may exhibit post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, are suicidal, and abuse alcohol and other substances. Soleimani, Ahmadi, & Yosefnezhad (2017) agree with Almi? et al. (2018) assertions concerning the relationship between domestic abuse and anxiety and stress among victims. According to Soleimani et al., (2017), intimate partner violence (IPV) has been linked to a rise in depression, PTSD, anxiety, and suicidal thoughts. Women who experience sexual and physical abuse from their spouses tend to exhibit depression-like symptoms. The researchers found that sleep-disorders, self-harm, anxiety, stress, and depression are some of the mental health issues that women have as a result of the trauma and stigma linked to their abuse. If the abuse continues for a long time, victims often experience a decline in self-confidence and self-esteem and usually display feelings of despair Social work practice and specifically clinical social workers have a significant responsibility in all aspect of domestic violence including advocacy, legislation, practice and policies (Slabbert., 2015). Although social workers engage in empowering practices and community engagement to achieve the goal of increasing survivor safety and wellbeing, they also help domestic violence survivors stabilize and heal over time through engagement in activities that addresses their symptoms (Robbins & Cook, 2018). To facilitate the therapeutic process, social workers utilize various intervention strategies to help clients deal with the effects of the trauma. These interventions require evaluation to ensure that agreed upon goals and objectives are being met (Bloom et al. 2009 pg. 4). Single-System Designs (SSD) are evaluation methods that can aid social workers to measure their progress in an intervention (Bloom et al. 2009 pg. 4). The DASS is one of such scales that allows clients to self-report their level of anxiety at any given time in the intervention process (Hackett, Mcwhirter & Lesher, 2016). This intervention establishes the level of anxiety based on the symptoms the client exhibits and social workers can use the information to choose therapeutic practices. Additionally, these measures can be used to re-assess the client’s state using the same scale to assess effectiveness (Hackett, Mcwhirter & Lesher, 2016). Literature Review Various researchers have reviewed models of intervention aimed at providing a therapeutic approach to victims of domestic violence. These researchers accept the fact that domestic violence is a potentially traumatizing experience that has devastating psychological and physical consequences. Domestic violence is a form of trauma that may result in significant mental health distress, particularly for women victims (Adelufosi et al, 2017). Victims often experience high rates of clinical depression and post-traumatic stress disorder, especially when the victims had experienced other lifetime trauma (Monahan, 2018). There are several clinical interventions that social workers can utilize to help individuals traumatized by domestic violence. One very effective treatment modality for clinical therapeutic interventions is Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT). CBT interventions are among the most frequently used approaches and are among the most commonly used interventions for women who are domestically abused (Adelufosi et al, 2017). Clinical social workers use Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) interventions for domestic violence offenders (Mandal, Hooker, Vally & Taft, 2018). This intervention approaches violence within an intimate partner as learned behavior. CBT can be used to attempt to change the behavior by identifying the thought processes and the beliefs that contribute to the cognitive processes (Monahan, 2018). The clinical social workers then attempt to challenge the victim’s mental pathway to trauma as well as their justification for self-deprecating behaviors (Shayan et al., 2018). Iverson et al, 2015 in their study, evaluates how Cognitive–behavioral therapy can reduce symptoms of intimate partner violence. In their study, they argue that about 25% of women will experience IPV in their lifetime, and without effective intervention the impacts of IPV may result in other complications such as anxiety, stress and depression. Researchers further contend that CBT intervention has the potential to reduce the psychological distress associated with the future victimization of the women who are at risk. Mandal, Hooker, Vally & Taft, (2018) in similar study argue that CBT can help reduce the psychological impacts of domestic violence among women in abusive relationships. According to research, mental health problems associated with IPV are associated with future victimization which may confer other risks to the survivors. Similarly, CBT reduces the symptoms and help abused women to regain their normal life by limiting the future impact of depressive disorder associated with the abuse. CBT thus highlights the needs of women and modify such needs to align with the modalities of the program. According to Van Dieten and King 2016, CBT is commonly used to treat the psychological problems related to the violence. The approach is based on the fundamental principles such as modeling, reinforcement, and behavioral and cognitive change which can largely contribute to the amenable outcome and favorable results. The approach is also supported by Adelufosi et al, 2017 that evaluated the use of CBT in reducing incidences of PTSD in women resulting from domestic violence. According to Adelufosi et al, 2017 CBT programs have the greatest impact when delivered to clients who are considered at greatest risk of developing PTSD particularly women confronted in violence in their relationships. Shayan et al., 2018 on the other hand relates the CBT to a short-term and problem-focused cognitive behavioral intervention strategy that allow the client to come in terms with the current problem. According to these two, it is based on evidence of the current situation and allows the client to come to terms with the problems surrounding the abuse. Such problems according to the authors are psychological and should be addressed by CBT that focuses more on treating the symptoms and preventing the aftermath. Clinicians wants to ensure that their intervention strategies are effective and meets their clients’ needs. Therefore, various Evidence-based practice (EBP) are introduced to this end. Like Chin, Buchanan, Ebesutani, & Young, (2019) and Scholten, et al. (2017), Lee, et al. (2019) suggests that DASS is important in measuring anxiety and stress amongst abused women. According to Lee et al. (2019), anxiety and stress are prevalent affects millions of women worldwide. These mental health disorders can result in poor functioning in diverse sectors such as education, career life, and social life. It is for these reasons that anxiety and stress should be screened earlier, and DASS is the appropriate tool for detecting these issues. DASS was created to determine and assess symptoms of depression and anxiety by using the triple paradigm. Moreover, DASS is a revised version of the original DASS and consists of 7 elements chosen from each of the three dimensions (Lee et al. 2019). Pezirkianidis et al. (2018) examined the consistency and validity of the Depression Anxiety and Stress Scales (DASS). They argued that the psychometric components of the DASS- had been evaluated by many studies. In general, these studies found that the three dimensions of DASS have effective internal consistency. Specifically, their consistency arises because of the alpha coefficients of depression scale, anxiety scale, and stress scale range between 0.83 and 0.94, 0.70 and 0.87, and 0.82 and 0.91, respectively. Furthermore, regarding discriminant and convergent validity, both the anxiety and depression scales exhibited adequate links with other respective assessments of depression and anxiety. CUA SWEEK 6250 S103 1801 Evaluation Strategy Evidence-Based Practice Intervention The previously stated Evidence-Based Practice Intervention, DASS, seems to be the most appropriate measure to determine if intervention methods, such as Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, is effective in treating women dealing with anxiety as a result of domestic violence (Wang et al., 2016). Scholten et al. (2017) cited that the Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scales (DASS) has 42 elements and three components. The depression component has symptoms of anhedonia and dormancy. The anxiety dimension entails symptoms of physical hyper-arousal and detailed anxiety. Lastly, the stress scale highlights deep distress associated with symptoms of anxiety and depression. Chin, Buchanan, Ebesutani, & Young, (2019) share Scholten et al. (2017) ideas regarding the role of DASS in measuring anxiety and stress. According to them, the DASS is a self-report tool that is not only easy to administer, but it is also easily available. They also contend that DASS is useful in measuring the effectiveness of CBT in the intervention process. Women who were identified as meeting criteria for intervention will fill the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales (DASS), which has questions to determine the severity of negative emotional states of anxiety on 14 items (Wang et al., 2016). The clients will fill in the DASS the first two weeks of therapy, six weeks into treatment, and the last week of treatment. Individuals will also be required to complete a final questioner four weeks off treatment as a follow-up strategy (Mandal, Hooker, Vally & Taft, 2018). The intervention is expected to have a positive impact as it will help clients identify symptoms; they might not be unaware of and establish strategies to solve problems (Hackett, Mcwhirter & Lesher, 2016). Positive outcomes can be realized through goals to decrease the number of anxiety symptoms by 50% in the first six weeks and 95% by the end of the intervention. Research Question and Hypothesis The independent variable is the intervention, DASS, which test the dependent variable, which is anxiety. The research question is: Does the use of DASS enhance the effectiveness of therapeutic services provided by a social worker to a woman experiencing anxiety due to domestic violence? References Adelufosi, A., Edet, B., Arikpo, D., Aquaisua, E., & Meremikwu, M. M. (2017). Cognitive behavioral therapy for post?traumatic stress disorder, depression, or anxiety disorders in women and girls living with female genital mutilation: A systematic review. International Journal of Gynecology & Obstetrics, 136, 56-59. Almi?, B. H., Kütük, E. K., Gümü?ta?, F., & Celik, M. (2018). Risk factors for domestic violence in women and predictors of the development of mental disorders in these women. Archives of Neuropsychiatry, 55(1), 67. Bloom, M., Fisher, J., Orme, J. G. (2009). Evaluating practice: Guidelines for the accountable professional (6th ed.). New York, NY: Pearson. Chin, E. G., Buchanan, E. M., Ebesutani, C., & Young, J. (2019). Depression, Anxiety, and Stress: How Should Clinicians Interpret the Total and Subscale Scores of the 21-Item Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scales?. Psychological Reports, 122(4), 1550-1575 Hackett, S., Mcwhirter, P., & Lesher, S. (2016). The Therapeutic Efficacy of Domestic Violence Victim Interventions. Trauma, Violence & Abuse , 17 (2), 123–132. https://doi.org/10.1177/1524838014566720 Iverson, K. M., Gradus, J. L., Resick, P. A., Suvak, M. K., Smith, K. F., & Monson, C. M. (2015). Cognitive–behavioral therapy for PTSD and depression symptoms reduces risk for future intimate partner violence among interpersonal trauma survivors. Journal of consulting and clinical psychology, 79(2), 193. Mandal, S. K., Hooker, L., Vally, H., & Taft, A. (2018). Partner violence and postnatal mental health: cross-sectional analysis of factors associated with depression and anxiety in new mothers. Australian journal of primary health, 24(5), 434-440. Monahan, K. (2018). Intimate Partner Violence, Traumatic Brain Injury, and Social Work: Moving Forward. Social Work, 63(2), 179–181. https://doi.org/10.1093/sw/swy005 Robbins, R., & Cook, K. (2018). “Don”t Even Get Us Started on Social Workers’: Domestic Violence, Social Work and Trust—An Anecdote from Research. The British Journal of Social Work, 48(6), 1664–1681. https://doi.org/10.1093/bjsw/bcx125 Shayan, A., Taravati, M., Garousian, M., Babakhani, N., Faradmal, J., & Masoumi, S. Z. (2018). The effect of cognitive behavioral therapy on marital quality among women. International journal of fertility & sterility, 12(2), 99. Scholten, S., Velten, J., Bieda, A., Zhang, X. C., & Margraf, J. (2017). Testing measurement invariance of the Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scales (DASS-21) across four countries. Psychological assessment, 29(11), 1376. Slabbert, I. (2015). The role of substance abuse in domestic violence: A social work perspective. Tydskrif Vir Geesteswetenskappe, 55(4), 665–680. https://doi.org/10.17159/2224-7912/2015/v55n4a11 Van Dieten, M., & King, E. (2014). Advancing the use of CBT with justice involved women. Forensic CBT: A handbook for clinical practice, 329-353. Wang, K., Shi, H., Geng, F., Zou, L., Tan, S., Wang, Y., … Chan, R. (2016). Cross-Cultural Validation of the Depression Anxiety Stress Scale–21 in China. Psychological Assessment , 28 (5), e88–e100. https://doi.org/10.1037/pas0000207 Wong, J. Y., Tiwari, A., Fong, D. Y., & Bullock, L. (2016). A cross-cultural understanding of depression among abused women. Violence against women, 22(11), 1371-1396. Please note that some references were use sparingly in this document since it was a challenge to find other literature to help support my assertions. Get a 10 % discount on an order above $ 100 Use the following coupon code : NURSING10

So much stress and so little time? Take care of yourself: let us help you with your task on
CUA SWEEK 6250 S103 1801 Evaluation Strategy
Get a 20% Discount on this Paper
Get Help Now
Calculate the price
Make an order in advance and get the best price
Pages (550 words)
$0.00
*Price with a welcome 15% discount applied.
Pro tip: If you want to save more money and pay the lowest price, you need to set a more extended deadline.
We know how difficult it is to be a student these days. That's why our prices are one of the most affordable on the market, and there are no hidden fees.

Instead, we offer bonuses, discounts, and free services to make your experience outstanding.
Sign up, place your order, and leave the rest to our professional paper writers in less than 2 minutes.
step 1
Upload assignment instructions
Fill out the order form and provide paper details. You can even attach screenshots or add additional instructions later. If something is not clear or missing, the writer will contact you for clarification.
s
Get personalized services with Do My Homeworkk
One writer for all your papers
You can select one writer for all your papers. This option enhances the consistency in the quality of your assignments. Select your preferred writer from the list of writers who have handledf your previous assignments
Same paper from different writers
Are you ordering the same assignment for a friend? You can get the same paper from different writers. The goal is to produce 100% unique and original papers
Copy of sources used
Our homework writers will provide you with copies of sources used on your request. Just add the option when plaing your order
What our partners say about us
Check out the latest reviews and opinions submitted by real customers worldwide and make an informed decision.
Business and administrative studies
Thank you so much for your help!!!!!
Customer 452519, November 9th, 2022
Finance
Wow! I should never have doubted you guys. Thank you for the excellent grade
Customer 452443, August 27th, 2021
M5A1 Outline and Thesis
Paper was late
Customer 452457, November 15th, 2021
Nursing
Excellent! Followed directions and completed a great paper
Customer 452445, August 22nd, 2021
National Security Intelligence and Security Analysis
Timeliness
Customer 452457, November 3rd, 2021
Economics
Thank you!
Customer 452493, March 16th, 2022
Chemistry
Excellent services!
Customer 452443, November 11th, 2021
Education
Looks good. Thank you!
Customer 452523, September 27th, 2022
Nursing
Good work, professional and beat the deadline. Thank you so very much
Customer 452445, August 24th, 2021
Economics
THANK YOU! :)
Customer 452493, April 12th, 2022
Classic English Literature
Much appreciated - thank you very much!
Customer 452493, April 13th, 2022
Anthropology
Thank you
Customer 452445, August 20th, 2021
OUR GIFT TO YOU
15% OFF your first order
Use a coupon FIRST15 and enjoy expert help with any task at the most affordable price.
Claim my 15% OFF Order in Chat

Order your essay today and save 15% with the discount code ESSAYHELP